Support for Movement Family in Charlotte

This week has been hit hard for our family on the ground in Charlotte and below are ways you can support them in their fight.

There will be a march tomorrow in Charlotte at 1PM: https://www.facebook.com/events/330644163949646/

Longer List of Asks:

+Liquid antacid, like Maalox
+ easel pad paper like the sticky kind,
+rags
+ individually wrapped snacks
+burner phones, bandanas,
+saline
+milk- especially quarts for easy packing
+ice packs for the milk
+first aid kits and supplies
+water
+gas masks
+high decibel ear plugs
+hard hats
+lots of goggles
+portable phone chargers
+water bottles
+spray paint
+plastic tarp

 

Organizations on the ground to get updates from:

TQPocC Coalition: https://www.facebook.com/qtpocclt/

The TRIBE: https://www.facebook.com/TheTribeClt/

BLM Charlotte:https://www.facebook.com/groups/849024471848530/

 

Donations:

 

TQPocC via Southern Vision Alliance: https://southernvision.ourpowerbase.net/civicrm/contribute/transact?reset=1&id=13

 

Durham Solidarity Center – Freedom Fighter Bond Fund: http://durhamsolidaritycenter.org/bondfund/

 

Rev. Sekou and the Holy Ghost Band performing at Homecoming Sept. 17th

1 Sekou + Jay Tower Grove Credit - April MartinWe’re excited to announce Rev. Sekou an the Holy Ghost band performing at Homecoming at 7:30 on September 17.

Click here to register for Homecoming
Less than six months after forming in the streets of Cleveland in a haze of pepper spray and tear gas, Rev. Sekou & the Holy Ghost released their debut album, “The Revolution Has Come”–released by St. Louis based record label, FarFetched in collaboration with The Fellowship of Reconciliation and Eloveate Music.   “The Revolution Has Come” is the highest grossing and fastest selling album FarFetched has ever released. Recorded in Saint Louis in mid-November, over 30 musicians, engineers, and vocalists from around the country brought this project into being.  AFROPUNK celebrates the album’s ”deep bone-marrow-level conviction”. The single, “We Comin’”–featuring  the 8-piece Saint Boogie Brass Brand–was named the new anthem for the modern Civil Rights movement by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.  The band has played over 40 shows around the country in the past 6 months.  The Rev. Sekou—a third generation Pentecostal preacher and long time organize— who has trained over 5000 activists in militant nonviolent civil disobedience in the aftermath of the Ferguson Rebellion. Singer-Songwriter and #SayHerName activist Jay-Marie is a genderqueer San Francisco Bay Area born and raised, an active member of the Black Lives Matter Bay Area Chapter.

 

The band is part of the Revive the Love Tour. The Tent Revival offers a space to recharge, replenish, and build. Over a span of 5 cities the tour intends to foster social engagement and support the movement for Black, LGBTQ, and immigrant lives in a way that recognizes the need for healing space and spiritual accompaniment. Given the national acrimony and social discourse, it is an opportunity to create spaces for artists and activists to sustain and be sustained by the movement.  This will be accomplished in four core ways:

  1. ‘Fortify the Movement’ workshop/discussion with Standing on the Side of Love
  2. An explicitly Pro-Black and Pro-Trans/GNC show by Rev. Sekou and the Holy Ghost in every site in relationship with local and national artists.
  3. Training and 1:1 support ‘clinics’ for lead organizers in local communities
  4. Strong local partnering in every site to build networked relationships

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About the sound:

The sound of Rev. Sekou & the Holy Ghost is a symphony of gospel, blues, soul, funk and freedom songs laced with sanctified blues and lyrics that range from religious to risqué. Their sonic landscape captures the toll of southern field hands, grieving mothers’ wails, the vibrancy of contemporary street protest, backwoods jukejoints, and shotgun churches—all driven by the Holy Ghosts’ funk bass line.”

 

For more info on the band, go to www.RSHGMusic.com

For more info on the tour, go to 

Celebration of Pam McMicheal: September 16th 7PM at Homecoming

 

On September 16, 2016 at 7PM we will be  celebrating the footsteps and transition of our very own director, Pam McMichael, who has given over a decade to Highlander and a lifetime to the movement! She has been the second longest serving director in Highlander’s history. The event will start at 6PM with dinner at the Workshop Center. There’ll be a suggestion donation of $20.

Click here to register for Homecoming

pamsdeparture

We thank her not only for her contributions, but her whole presence in this day and time.

One-day Economics and Governance Curriculum Session at Homecoming Sept. 16

We are very excited to share our one-day Economics and Governance Curriculum on Friday, September 16th from 9am-5pm. This is a very participatory curriculum, built to help communities demystify our economic and governance systems, to show how they interconnect, and to encourage people to analyze their communities while looking for projects and alternatives that can shift power and resources back into the hands of our communities. If you are interested in this event, please indicate your interest on the Homecoming Registration Form. We have scholarships for people to attend Homecoming who are interested in potentially bringing this curriculum back to their organization or community. For more info on the session, contact Samir Rohlin Hazboun at [email protected]

Click here to register for Homecoming

Highlander’s Statement on DACA/DAPA

On Thursday, June 23, the Supreme Court announced a deadlocked decision that affected President Obama’s administrative program commonly referred to as Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) and its companion program that would have expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). In the 4-4 disappointing tie, the deadlocked decision blocks a plan that would affect an estimate of five million undocumented immigrants.

“The Supreme Court has dealt, yet another blow to immigrants, cutting off relief for millions”- Carl Luscombe of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI)

“We’re deeply disappointed that the Supreme Court sided with states and opportunistic politicians who continue to dehumanize undocumented communities. These programs would have protected close to 5 million people from deportation. While this ruling is not what we wanted, we are not deterred and will continue to organize and mobilize our communities against the deportation machine because our lives and those of our loved ones depend on it. To our undocumented sisters and brothers we say, ‘Never give up. We will continue to fight alongside you and will not rest until every single one of our undocumented communities is safe and able to live without fear”- Nayely Perez-Huerta, Co-Director of the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network.

 

There are resources and actions from groups who have been and will continue to organize for the rights of immigrant families across our region and the nation.

https://action.mijente.net/petitions/no-dapa-no-deportations-1?source=facebook-share-button <Petition for No Dapa, No Deportations.

http://www.tnimmigrant.org/blog/ <Statement from Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition

http://blackalliance.org/DACA_BlkImms/ Statement from Black Alliance for Just Immigration on how the decision affects Black Immigrants

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ARfY0D9WqSq9d0l92d3eOvNOxbRPQuBXSXxNFRi69oA/viewform?c=0&w=1 <Register for a national call  July 7th, 2016 for A Kinship Action Call – Beyond DACA/DAPA- Taking Action for Black Immigrants – 2pm Pacific/ 5pm Eastern

http://seirn.squarespace.com/press-releases-statements/ <Statement from Southeast Immigrant Rights Network.

https://weareakin.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/press-release-akin-deplores-supreme-court-decision/ <Statement from Allies of Knoxville Immigrant Neighbors.

We stand united against the racist and white supremacist policies and actions. If there are ways that Highlander staff, board, and family can support please contact us.

Highlander's Statement on DACA/DAPA

On Thursday, June 23, the Supreme Court announced a deadlocked decision that affected President Obama’s administrative program commonly referred to as Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) and its companion program that would have expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). In the 4-4 disappointing tie, the deadlocked decision blocks a plan that would affect an estimate of five million undocumented immigrants.

“The Supreme Court has dealt, yet another blow to immigrants, cutting off relief for millions”- Carl Luscombe of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration (BAJI)

“We’re deeply disappointed that the Supreme Court sided with states and opportunistic politicians who continue to dehumanize undocumented communities. These programs would have protected close to 5 million people from deportation. While this ruling is not what we wanted, we are not deterred and will continue to organize and mobilize our communities against the deportation machine because our lives and those of our loved ones depend on it. To our undocumented sisters and brothers we say, ‘Never give up. We will continue to fight alongside you and will not rest until every single one of our undocumented communities is safe and able to live without fear”- Nayely Perez-Huerta, Co-Director of the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network.

 

There are resources and actions from groups who have been and will continue to organize for the rights of immigrant families across our region and the nation.

https://action.mijente.net/petitions/no-dapa-no-deportations-1?source=facebook-share-button <Petition for No Dapa, No Deportations.

http://www.tnimmigrant.org/blog/ <Statement from Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition

http://blackalliance.org/DACA_BlkImms/ Statement from Black Alliance for Just Immigration on how the decision affects Black Immigrants

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ARfY0D9WqSq9d0l92d3eOvNOxbRPQuBXSXxNFRi69oA/viewform?c=0&w=1 <Register for a national call  July 7th, 2016 for A Kinship Action Call – Beyond DACA/DAPA- Taking Action for Black Immigrants – 2pm Pacific/ 5pm Eastern

http://seirn.squarespace.com/press-releases-statements/ <Statement from Southeast Immigrant Rights Network.

https://weareakin.wordpress.com/2016/06/23/press-release-akin-deplores-supreme-court-decision/ <Statement from Allies of Knoxville Immigrant Neighbors.

We stand united against the racist and white supremacist policies and actions. If there are ways that Highlander staff, board, and family can support please contact us.

Highlander Homecoming 2016: Collective Courage Sept. 16-18, 2016

Collective Courage: Standing Up, Fighting Back, and Building Self-Determined Beautiful Solutions September 16-18, 2016

Homecoming Schedule + International Speaker Announcements

Join us as we dig deep into what the road ahead holds in building a solidarity economy, new leadership, politics, roles, and relationships. We will be lifting up the legacy of seasoned leadership while discussing the current moment and upcoming movement leaders, all in traditional Highlander fashion, with workshops and plenaries, conversation and culture, lots of singing, food, friendship, and recommitting ourselves to the long haul. Let’s work together to build on the amazing work for justice as we celebrate the footsteps and transition of our very own director, Pam McMichael, who has given over a decade to Highlander and a lifetime to the movement!

There’s a suggested donation of $20 for the Pam McMichael’s Celebration Party Friday evening, Sept. 16. Saturday registration is $52 and $32 for Sunday. For both Saturday and Sunday, there’s a sliding scale of $84-$384. Camping is available at $15 per person at night.

The Economic and Governance One-Day Curriculum will be Friday, 9am-5pm, and Pam McMichael’s Party will be starting with dinner at 6pm and the party 7-9pm.. On-site registration starts at 8am on Saturday, Sept. 17. Saturday’s programming runs from 10am-9:30pm, and Sunday’s programming will run 9:30am-1pm, ending with lunch on Sept. 18. There’s a $20 fee for dinner Saturday evening if would like to join us..

Sunday includes a cultural performance, lunch, round-table discussions, activist/author talks, and music.

Friday –Join us for the launch of Highlander’s Economics and Governance One-Day Curriculum.

We are very excited to share our Economics and Governance One-Day Curriculum on Friday, September 16th from 9am-5pm.   This is a very participatory curriculum, built to help communities demystify our economic and governance systems, to show how they interconnect and to encourage people to analyze their communities and look for projects and alternatives that can shift power and resources back into the hands of our communities.  If you are interested in this event, please register your interest.  We have scholarships for people to attend our Homecoming who are interested in potentially bringing this curriculum back to their organization or community.   If you are interested in this event, you can register at test.highlandercenter.org. Contact Samir Rohlin Hazboun at [email protected] for more information.

 

Click here to register for Homecoming

For lodging at area hotels:
Day’s Inn at $99/night
3402 Winfield Dunn Parkway
Kodak, TN 37764 865-933-4500 ask for Highlander Homecoming

Comfort Suites at $109/night

161 W. Dumplin Valley Road

Kodak, TN  37764 865-933-3131 ask for Highlander Homecoming

Schedule to come soon

For more information, contact Andre Canty at 865-360-7321 or [email protected]

Children's Camp “I Can Help Make a Change”-July 10-16

Also part of Seeds of Fire, our Children’s Justice Camp is a week-long summer camp for young people 6-12 years of age whose families are interested in social democracy, justice, and environmental awareness. At the camp, children from diverse racial, ethnic, socio-economic, and cultural backgrounds join together for a week of sharing, fun, learning, and growing.

This year’s camp will be July 10-16, 2016. 

Our theme this year is “I Can Help Make a Change.”  We will be focusing on how people individually and collectively can make changes happen.  We will help the campers figure out some causes or issues that are important to them.  We will show how individuals can come together to make their opinions known and to influence others. Below is the application and family letter.

Mail in the application at
Highlander Center
Children’s Camp
1959 Highlander Way
New Market, TN 37820

For more info, contact Samir Hazboun: [email protected] or 865-335-2443

Childrens-Camp-2016-Application

 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1J2mm_CrHbfqdSgEX78RlhU7dfA8s93pmcLs6VP9F4XM/viewform<Online form

Campers family letter – 2016

Children’s Camp “I Can Help Make a Change”-July 10-16

Also part of Seeds of Fire, our Children’s Justice Camp is a week-long summer camp for young people 6-12 years of age whose families are interested in social democracy, justice, and environmental awareness. At the camp, children from diverse racial, ethnic, socio-economic, and cultural backgrounds join together for a week of sharing, fun, learning, and growing.

This year’s camp will be July 10-16, 2016. 

Our theme this year is “I Can Help Make a Change.”  We will be focusing on how people individually and collectively can make changes happen.  We will help the campers figure out some causes or issues that are important to them.  We will show how individuals can come together to make their opinions known and to influence others. Below is the application and family letter.

Mail in the application at
Highlander Center
Children’s Camp
1959 Highlander Way
New Market, TN 37820

For more info, contact Samir Hazboun: [email protected] or 865-335-2443

Childrens-Camp-2016-Application

 

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1J2mm_CrHbfqdSgEX78RlhU7dfA8s93pmcLs6VP9F4XM/viewform<Online form

Campers family letter – 2016

Introducing the Greensboro Justice Fund Fellows at Highlander 2016-17

gjf2016

Greensboro Justice Fund Fellows 2016-17 began their fellowship this week by attending Highlander’s Wacky Workshop Week.
Pictured here are, from left to right: Tiffany Marceaux McCulley, Ekua Adisa, Daniela Saczek, Courtnay Coco Papy, and Stacey Padilla.

We’re excited to introduce the the 2016-17 class of the Greensboro Justice Fund Fellowship at Highlander! Please join us in welcoming Ekua Adisa, Daniela Saczek, Stacey Padilla, Tiffany Marceaux McCulley, and Courtnay Coco Papy.

 

Each year, five organizers from across the South are selected for the yearlong learning and relationship building fellowship. The fellowship was created in honor of the five community organizers – Cesar Cauce, Mike Nathan, Bill Sampson, Sandy Smith, and Jim Waller – who were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan and the Nazi Party on November 3, 1979.

 

Ekua Adisa is a queer non-binary spoonie* (see “Spoons Theory“) of African descent. Their work in the world is rooted in healing and housed in the South of the US, which they see as a place of potent power for healing, especially for people of African descent. Their work can look like hosting retreats, workshops, and conversations for folks to heal and evolve within, providing one-on-one spiritual council and aiding folks in connecting with their ancestors for guidance, or building community on porches while drinking #Lemonade. Ekua is also a ritual performer, healing artist, and a liberationist. They work for themselves in community and collaboration, and are committed to all things grassroots, including but not limited to #GrassrootsReparations. They believe that change happens from within and the best way to invite change is to model it. They do their best to model this truth in their parenting of their two and a half year old child who is called Akoma.

 

Daniela Saczek is Venezuelan and was raised in Miami, Florida. She attended Florida International University for undergrad where she studied Political Science and the University of Miami where she received a Masters in the discipline of Community Psychology. During her years in undergrad,  she became involved with the Student/ Farmworker Alliance organization and discovered a passion for community organizing. Since 2011 she has been involved with various organizations and campaigns in Florida, including participating in the Black Lives Matter and Immigrant Rights Movements.

 

Stacey Padilla has spent most of her life in the foothills of East Tennessee, among the first generation of her Mexican-Puerto Rican-Lithuanian family living in Appalachia. She graduated from Maryville College in 2015, where she double-majored in Sociology and Spanish, minored in International Studies, and became a Certified Nonprofit Professional. She works for her local domestic violence program as an Advocate for victims staying in the confidential safe house, as well as working with the community as the Volunteer Coordinator. Stacey’s involvement in the anti-violence movement also includes membership in el Comité Popular de Knoxville, a grassroots immigrants’ rights organization, and the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition’s Tuition Equality Now! Campaign, working to allow in-state tuition for undocumented college students in Tennessee. She is also enthusiastic about reproductive rights, education, and her cat Mazapán. She is excited and honored to be a part of Highlander.

 

Tiffany Marceaux McCulley is an organizer and creative spirit living and co-resisting in New Orleans where she organizes white folks for racial justice with European Dissent New Orleans.  She is an Instagram admin for The Body Is Not An Apology, promoting body positivity and unapologetic radical self-love as tools for collective liberation.  She is the co-founder of Grrrl Scouts, a feminist collective and scout troop for adult women.  She enjoys making zines, exploring the intersection of feminism and science fiction, and working with herbs.

 

Courtnay Coco Papy is an activist, writer and native Savannahian who has returned home and happily so. As lead organizer of Emergent Savannah, she develops the vision of the Emergent Savannah and takes care of the nitty-gritty operational management. She is a Step-Up Savannah Neighborhood Leadership Academy graduate and served as the

Creative Director of the Flannery O’Connor Book Trail and currently serves on the Department of Cultural Affairs Commission Board, works as an independent educator across Savannah, predominantly in Title 1 schools and after-school programs, is a PEN America Prison Writing Fellow and also works as Assistant Director of Communications at a local independent school.