We Shall Overcome Fund Application due June 1, 2017

We Shall Overcome” served as the theme song of the Civil Rights Movement and is now a worldwide anthem for freedom and justice. Since 1966, the Highlander Research and Education Center has administered the We Shall Overcome Fund, which is generated by royalties from the commercial use of the song “We Shall Overcome.”

Upcoming Deadlines:  June 1, 2017 

Important things to keep in mind:

  • Important to make sure that proposals are received complete.
  • Letters of support must be signed and must have 3.
  • Budget must be submitted and explain use of all money being requested.
  • Contact info should include phone number and email address for person applying.

June 2017 application form for We Shall Overcome Fund

Send the original application and all supporting documents to:

We Shall Overcome Fund

Highlander Research and Education Center

1959 Highlander Way

New Market, TN 37820

Or send the original application and all supporting documents as one file in an e-mail to the WSO address at [email protected].

There’s also a final report to be mailed within one month after the completion of the project. Prompt submission of your report will assure the Committee’s favorable attention to future grant requests.

WSOC-FinalReport-Form

We shall Overcome Fund

PURPOSE OF THE FUND

Created to nurture grassroots efforts within African American communities to use art and activism against injustice, the We Shall Overcome Fund supports organizing in the South that is at the nexus of culture and social change.

Because of the song’s history and use in the primarily southern-based struggle against racism and injustice, African American communities must benefit from Fund-supported projects. We strongly encourage proposals from diverse racial and ethnic communities working in coalition to end racism, economic and environmental injustice, sexism and homophobia.

The We Shall Overcome Fund supports a wide range of projects including:

  • Performance and visual arts projects linked to or directly serving efforts that seek to transform unjust social, economic, and political environments/conditions/imbalances;
  • Workshops, conferences, and research projects that use arts and culture to build coalitions, share information, inspire, and mobilize people to take action;
  • Preservation of Civil Rights Movement documents; multi-media research projects that document and share the history of the Movement.

We Shall Overcome Fund support has been vital to the success of cultural and social programs in rural and urban communities throughout the South. Our funding provides critical support to initiate and sustain innovative efforts at the nexus of culture and social change.

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Cultural Activists
  • Educators
  • Organizers
  • Organizations

For projects that use arts, culture and community activism to organize for social, economic, and political justice to the benefit of African American communities.

Requests are accepted from the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.

  • Project funding not to exceed $2,000
  • To apply you must complete an application form.
  • Application Deadline: June 1 2017

Please Note: It can take up to 30 days after a deadline for applications to be processed and funding decisions to be made. Therefore, if your project/event will occur within 30 days of a deadline, you should apply during the previous grant cycle.

 

Contact:  Brandi Augustus
Phone: 865-360-8224 Email:  [email protected]

 

We Shall Overcome Fund Application due Jan. 27, 2017

We Shall Overcome” served as the theme song of the Civil Rights Movement and is now a worldwide anthem for freedom and justice. Since 1966, the Highlander Research and Education Center has administered the We Shall Overcome Fund, which is generated by royalties from the commercial use of the song “We Shall Overcome.”

Upcoming Deadlines: January 27 and June 1, 2017 

Important things to keep in mind:

  • Important to make sure that proposals are received complete.
  • Letters of support must be signed and must have 3.
  • Budget must be submitted and explain use of all money being requested.
  • Contact info should include phone number and email address for person applying.

Click here to download the application form for the We Shall Overcome Fund.

Send the original application and all supporting documents to:

We Shall Overcome Fund

Highlander Research and Education Center

1959 Highlander Way

New Market, TN 37820

Or send the original application and all supporting documents as one file in an e-mail to the WSO address at [email protected].

There’s also a final report to be mailed within one month after the completion of the project. Prompt submission of your report will assure the Committee’s favorable attention to future grant requests.

Click here to download the Final Report Form.

We shall Overcome Fund

PURPOSE OF THE FUND

Created to nurture grassroots efforts within African American communities to use art and activism against injustice, the We Shall Overcome Fund supports organizing in the South that is at the nexus of culture and social change.

Because of the song’s history and use in the primarily southern-based struggle against racism and injustice, African American communities must benefit from Fund-supported projects. We strongly encourage proposals from diverse racial and ethnic communities working in coalition to end racism, economic and environmental injustice, sexism and homophobia.

The We Shall Overcome Fund supports a wide range of projects including:

  • Performance and visual arts projects linked to or directly serving efforts that seek to transform unjust social, economic, and political environments/conditions/imbalances;
  • Workshops, conferences, and research projects that use arts and culture to build coalitions, share information, inspire, and mobilize people to take action;
  • Preservation of Civil Rights Movement documents; multi-media research projects that document and share the history of the Movement.

We Shall Overcome Fund support has been vital to the success of cultural and social programs in rural and urban communities throughout the South. Our funding provides critical support to initiate and sustain innovative efforts at the nexus of culture and social change.

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Cultural Activists
  • Educators
  • Organizers
  • Organizations

For projects that use arts, culture and community activism to organize for social, economic, and political justice to the benefit of African American communities.

Requests are accepted from the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.

  • Project funding not to exceed $2,000
  • To apply you must complete an application form.
  • Application Deadline: January 27 and June 1 2017

Please Note: It can take up to 30 days after a deadline for applications to be processed and funding decisions to be made. Therefore, if your project/event will occur within 30 days of a deadline, you should apply during the previous grant cycle.

 

Contact:  Coy Wakefield
Phone: 865-933-3443 x226 Email:  [email protected]

 

We Shall Overcome Fund Deadline-June 1, 2014

We Shall Overcome” served as the theme song of the Civil Rights Movement and is now a worldwide anthem for freedom and justice. Since 1966, the Highlander Research and Education Center has administered the We Shall Overcome Fund, which is generated by royalties from the commercial use of the song “We Shall Overcome.”

Upcoming Deadline June 1, 2014

For more information, contact:  Tufara Muhammad
Phone: 865-933-3443 Ext. 231

Emaill: [email protected]

Click here to download the application form for the We Shall Overcome Fund.

Important things to keep in mind:

  • Important to make sure that proposals are received complete.
  • Letters of support must be signed and must have 3.
  • Budget must be submitted and explain use of all money being requested.
  • Contact info should include phone number and email address for person applying.

We shall Overcome Fund

PURPOSE OF THE FUND

Created to nurture grassroots efforts within African American communities to use art and activism against injustice, the We Shall Overcome Fund supports organizing in the South that is at the nexus of culture and social change.

Because of the song’s history and use in the primarily southern-based struggle against racism and injustice, African American communities must benefit from Fund-supported projects. We strongly encourage proposals from diverse racial and ethnic communities working in coalition to end racism, economic and environmental injustice, sexism and homophobia.

The We Shall Overcome Fund supports a wide range of projects including:

  • Performance and visual arts projects linked to or directly serving efforts that seek to transform unjust social, economic, and political environments/conditions/imbalances;
  • Workshops, conferences, and research projects that use arts and culture to build coalitions, share information, inspire, and mobilize people to take action;
  • Preservation of Civil Rights Movement documents; multi-media research projects that document and share the history of the Movement.

We Shall Overcome Fund support has been vital to the success of cultural and social programs in rural and urban communities throughout the South. Our funding provides critical support to initiate and sustain innovative efforts at the nexus of culture and social change.

WHO CAN APPLY

  • Cultural Activists
  • Educators
  • Organizers
  • Organizations

For projects that use arts, culture and community activism to organize for social, economic, and political justice to the benefit of African American communities.

Requests are accepted from the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.

  • Project funding not to exceed $2,000
  • To apply you must complete an application form.
  • Application Deadline: January 15 2014 and June 1 2014

Please Note: It can take up to 30 days after a deadline for applications to be processed and funding decisions to be made. Therefore, if your project/event will occur within 30 days of a deadline, you should apply during the previous grant cycle. For example, if your event will occur in June 2014, you should apply by the January 15, 2014 deadline.

 

 

 

 

We Shall Overcome Strategy Sessions 2014 in Raleigh,NC, Jackson,MS, and Knoxville,TN.

Click here to participate in the WSOC Strategy Sessions for 2014 in Raleigh, NC(Jan. 31-Feb.2, 2014), Jackson, MS(Feb. 14-16, 2014), and Knoxville, TN (Jan. 10-12, 2014).

Registrations for Jackson, MS are open.

The Jackson Unity Mixer (Feb. 15 at 7PM CST) is one of three historical Regional Strategy Sessions being held in New Market TN, Jackson MS and Raleigh NC, pulling in those working at the nexus of art and social change in the Southeastern US. The Mixer is open to all who want to intend. As long as you RSVP. The location will at the Soul Wired Cafe on 111 Millsaps Ave. Jackson, MS 39202

Are you working in African American Communities using art and culture at the nexus of social change? The Highlander Center is co-hosting a series of Regional Strategy Sessions sponsored by the We Shall Overcome Fund and regional partners that might be just for you. These sessions are being held in three separate locations. The first one in Knoxville TN, in collaboration with the Appalachian Community Fund. The second one In Raleigh, NC, in collaboration with Black Workers for Justice and the Fruit of Labor and the third one in Jackson, MS in collaboration with Alternate Roots and Junebug Productions.

These Strategy Sessions are a way to increase the opportunities for African-American artists and community activists to come together to promote collaborative work, relationship building, and to assist in the building of long term movement infrastructure. These sessions include two components. The first component is a Community Unity Mixers, which are open to all desiring to attend. The second component, the two day strategy sessions which are limited to grantees and others by invitation only. Spaces are limited so there is a two person maximum for organizations or project.

For more information, contact Tufara Muhammad at tufara at test.highlandercenter.org or at 865-933-3443 ext. 231 –

Workshop Work Week, W-7.5, Gets Even More Wonderful

Workshop participants share their experiences as they learn about Highlander’s methodologies. Photo by Susan Williams.
Workshop participants share their experiences as they learn about Highlander’s methodologies.
Photo by Susan Williams.

Highlander’s fifth annual Witty & Wonderful, Wild & Wacky Workshop Work Week was a huge success, thanks to the fantastic group of organizers, activists, scholars, and students who came from Utah to western Mass and everywhere in between to engage with Highlander and its work. In the mornings, Highlander’s staff led workshops on our methodologies of popular education, cultural organizing, and participatory action research, and explored how to put those methodologies to use in work in their communities.

In the afternoons, participants worked in service to the land and place of Highlander all across the Hill, from clearing and expanding the hiking trails to wrangling the goats, to transplanting herbs and clearing out invasive plant species, or washing windows in the Workshop Center. Evenings of cultural sharing gave the participants the chance to learn about each other’s lives, backgrounds, and work, and the Friday night square dance gave everyone the chance to cut loose after an exciting, productive week.

Workshop participant, Dr. Sherry Herbers, treated Highlander’s staff to a wonderful presentation, dramatic reading, and discussion about Dr. Lilian Johnson, the educator and former college president who donated the land for Highlander Folk School to Myles Horton and Don West in 1932. Herbers has written a full act play about the start and early days of Highlander and Dr. Johnson’s relationship to those efforts.

Highlander’s Greensboro Justice Fund Fellows were back on the hill for W-7.5 as part of their fellowship activities, and spent an afternoon with Guy and Candie Carawan discussing organizing for the Long Haul.

Our wacky workshoppers enjoy an old-fashioned Highlander square dance.  Photo by Donald Jones.
Our wacky workshoppers enjoy an old-fashioned Highlander square dance.
Photo by Donald Jones.

Greensboro Justice Fund Fellow Jose Eduardo Sanchez said he would be taking home “many stories of struggle and hope and the renewed energy and love to keep working in my community.”

And David Doty of The Interfaith Resource Center for Peace and Justice, said, “I wish I had done this forty years ago.”

Thanks to everyone who made the week such a success. We can’t wait to do it again next year! Mark your calendar now for W-7.6, May 27-31, 2014.

Strength through Song at the Zilphia Horton Cultural Organizing Institute

Zilphiagroupphoto: This year’s group of artists and organizers at the Zilphia Horton Cultural Organizing Institute.
Zilphiagroupphoto: This year’s group of artists and organizers at the Zilphia Horton Cultural Organizing Institute.
This year’s group of artists and organizers at the Zilphia Horton Cultural Organizing Institute.

The 2nd Zilphia Horton Cultural Organizing Institute brought cultural workers and groups from Nashville, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Philadelphia to Highlander this June to explore how to incorporate culture, song, and art into organizing campaigns in their community.

The Institute was framed with a focus on intersectionality and organizing across differences and included an introduction to the nuts and bolts of cultural organizing, a song-sharing workshop, story circles, art making, and time devoted to health and wellness. Participants also had the opportunity to engage in international conversations with Tutu Alicante, who works for justice in Equatorial Guinea, Zambian activist Kiss Abraham, and South African activist Nkwame Cedile, about connections between the US South and the Global South, cultural organizing from their lens, and how to use art as activism.

Throughout the week, the groups worked with each other and with Highlander’s team of facilitators to develop detailed work plans to strengthen their campaigns through the use of culture, and they have now returned to their communities to put those plans into action. Goals included: to ensure diversity and dialogue in the immigrant and refugee rights movement, to help white organizers address issues of white supremacy and privilege, to restructure their city council for greater representation of the people, to promote community healing through intentional use of public space, and to address environmental justice in the Louisiana community surrounding the world’s largest petrochemical plant.

The Institute is named in honor of Highlander’s first cultural organizer, Zilphia Horton, and we look forward to watching her legacy continue and deepen through today’s cultural organizing  work in communities across the region.

Southern Jam

Activists and organizers from across the South do some actual jamming as part of the Southern Jam. Photo by Abeni El-Amin

In March, Highlander hosted the Southern Jam in collaboration with the Emerging ChangeMakers NetworkYES!, Grassroots Democracy, and Southern Partners Fund. The Jam brought together 30 activists, organizers, leaders, and thinkers ages 20 to 43 from across the South to strategize about the best ways to work together for progressive change in the region. The gathering centered around relating to each other differently, building new models, creating new policies, and striving for change on multiple levels: personal, interpersonal, and systemic.

The mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, friends, neighbors, and children at the Jam acknowledged the many different paths toward creating a new South, and focused on finding ways to support each other regionally in the local work which is at the heart of building stronger communities. As they move forward into the next phase of this ongoing “think-act tank,” participants will develop skills and common resources, take their local work to a larger scale, plan future Jams across the region, and stay connected through learning exchanges, forums, and monthly calls.

Extreme Extraction Summit

Susan Williams and Elandria Williams facilitate 70 activists from diverse backgrounds at the Extreme Extraction Summit. Photo by David Braun.
Susan Williams and Elandria Williams facilitate 70 activists from diverse backgrounds at the Extreme Extraction Summit. Photo by David Braun.
Susan Williams and Elandria Williams facilitate 70 activists from diverse backgrounds at the Extreme Extraction Summit. Photo by David Braun.

Earlier this year, Highlander Education Team members Elandria Williams and Susan Williams facilitated an Extreme Extraction Summit in upstate New York. The summit brought together 70 activists from groups across the country (including Alaska!) who are organizing to fight coal, oil, fracking, uranium extraction, tar sands, industrial biomass, and their devastating effects on communities and environments. During the snowy weekend at the beautiful Ashokan retreat center, Highlander staff led the groups through exchanges that shared their experiences, developed strategies, sang songs and worked to join themselves together into a broader, stronger movement to overturn the deeply-rooted, complex system of business and government that profits off of energy while destroying the lives and health of local communities.

Participants in the Summit established general principles for their work together, including an acknowledgment of the strength of their diversity, a promise that no people should have to suffer in order to provide energy for others, and, at the core of Highlander’s approach, the understanding that those most affected by the issue of energy extraction are the most qualified to solve it. They also left with specific, concrete plans for moving the work forward, collaborating, and creating the infrastructure which will combine the strengths of different groups without bogging them down with bureaucracy or replicating already existing efforts. As Mathew Louis-Rosenberg, one of the Summit’s organizers, put it, “There was an incredibly powerful feeling in the room during this summit that we were on the cusp of something very big, but whether that proves to be true depends on the work we put in now and [the] ways in which we do our work differently back home with our renewed commitment to solidarity.” A follow-up summit is being planned for later in the year.

On The Hill and Across the South: SEIRN Works for Immigrant Rights

In January, Highlander hosted and participated in a strategy session for the Southeast Immigrant Rights Network (SEIRN), which brought together representatives from statewide immigrant coalitions, grassroots groups, and regional partners to connect its members with campaigns around immigration reform. In addition to discussing the prospects for national immigration reform, the group focused its strategy on what to expect on the state and local levels and how its members could collaborate and support one another in those battleswhile keeping the voices and experiences of local grassroots groups central to the movement and strategy. SEIRN’s Regional Coordinator Mónica Hernández notes that the network is also working to reframe the issue of immigrant rights, “not just as a Latino issue but one that affects many refugee communities, and to tie it into a framework broader than just immigrant rights.”

This aim of connecting its own struggle to a broader movement for justice was one of the reasons SEIRN picked Highlander for its strategy session. “We felt Highlander was the most appropriate place to have the kind of conversations we needed to have about movement building beyond any particular campaign,” Hernández says. “A lot of our folks feel connected to the legacy of Highlander and the role it’s played in progressive movement building.”  And the spirit of Highlander’s philosophy and methodology energized the session when Highlander’s consultants amd long-time friends, cultural organizers Guy and Candie Carawan joined the group for a meal.  “Candie got up and addressed us,” Hernández says. “She told us how happy she was for us to be there and said, ‘I hope you do a lot of singing.’ That just inspired everybody, and we added that crucial component of singing. It provided more of a glue for people to feel like we were really building something together.”